Sandro Botticelli
Sandro Botticelli's Oil Paintings
Sandro Botticelli Museum
c. 1445 – May 17, 1510. Italian painter.

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Sandro Botticelli
Details of Primavera (mk36)

ID: 25051

Sandro Botticelli Details of Primavera (mk36)
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Sandro Botticelli Details of Primavera (mk36)


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Sandro Botticelli

Italian Early Renaissance Painter, 1445-1510 Italian painter and draughtsman. In his lifetime he was one of the most esteemed painters in Italy, enjoying the patronage of the leading families of Florence, in particular the Medici and their banking clients. He was summoned to take part in the decoration of the Sistine Chapel in Rome, was highly commended by diplomatic agents to Ludovico Sforza in Milan and Isabella d Este in Mantua and also received enthusiastic praise from the famous mathematician Luca Pacioli and the humanist poet Ugolino Verino. By the time of his death, however, Botticelli s reputation was already waning. He was overshadowed first by the advent of what Vasari called the maniera devota, a new style by Perugino, Francesco Francia and the young Raphael, whose new and humanly affective sentiment, infused atmospheric effects and sweet colourism took Italy by storm; he was then eclipsed with the establishment immediately afterwards of the High Renaissance style, which Vasari called the modern manner, in the paintings of Michelangelo and the mature works of Raphael in the Vatican. From that time his name virtually disappeared until the reassessment of his reputation that gathered momentum in the 1890s   Related Paintings of Sandro Botticelli :. | Pieta (mk08) | Virgin and child with two angels | La Primavera | A Young Man being introduced to the Seven Liberal Arts | Annunciation |
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ulrica fredrica pasch
Ulrika Fredrika Pasch, född 10 juli 1735 i Stockholm, död 2 april 1796, var en svensk konstnär. Hon var dotter till konstnären Lorens Pasch d.ä. och Anna Helena Beckamn, syster till konstnären Lorens Pasch d.y. och brorsdotter till konstnären Johan Pasch. Ulrika Pasch började måla 1756 men hade tidigt tillsammans med sin bror fått undervisning av fadern. Hon blev hushållerska åt en släkting, men målade på fritiden. Under en tioårsperiod försörjde hon sin pappa och syster som professionell porträttmålare i Stockholm innan hennes bror återvände från sina studier utomlands 1766, då de började arbeta tillsammans. Deras samarbete beskrivs som harmoniskt och de valdes båda in i konstakademien 1773. Hon var inte den första kvinnan som valdes in i akademin, men hon var den första kvinnliga yrkeskonstnären som blev vald. Hon ska ha målat detaljerna på broderns tavlor, som klädesdetaljer och liknande. Ulrika hade en framgångsrik karriär och målade ofta porträtt av kungafamiljen och hovet. Hon ansökte dock upprepade gånger förgäves för en pension. Systern Helena Lovisa (1744-96) hushållade åt sina syskon. Trots att det sägs att hon själv var en ödmjuk person som aldrig framhävde sitt arbete, så är hon en av få kända självförsörjande kvinnliga yrkeskonstnärer i Skandinavien före artonhundratalet.
Kasimir Sergeevich Malevich
Ukrainian Cubist Painter, 1878-1935
bruno liljefors
Bruno Andreas Liljefors (1860-1939) was a Swedish artist, the most important and probably the most influential wildlife painter of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.[1] He also drew some sequential picture stories, making him one of the early Swedish comic creators. Liljefors is held in high esteem by painters of wildlife and is acknowledged as an influence, for example, by American wildlife artist Bob Kuhn.[1] All his life Liljefors was a hunter, and he often painted predator-prey action, the hunts engaged between fox and hare, sea eagle and eider, and goshawk and black grouse serving as prime examples.[1] However, he never exaggerated the ferocity of the predator or the pathos of the prey, and his pictures are devoid of sentimentality. The influence of the Impressionists can be seen in his attention to the effects of environment and light, and later that of Art Nouveau in his Mallards, Evening of 1901, in which the pattern of the low sunlight on the water looks like leopardskin, hence the Swedish nickname Panterfällen.[1] Bruno was fascinated by the patterns to be found in nature, and he often made art out of the camouflage patterns of animals and birds. He particularly loved painting capercaillies against woodland, and his most successful painting of this subject is the largescale Capercaillie Lek, 1888, in which he captures the atmosphere of the forest at dawn. He was also influenced by Japanese art, for example in his Goldfinches of the late 1880s.[1] During the last years of the nineteenth century, a brooding element entered his work, perhaps the result of turmoil in his private life, as he left his wife, Anna, and took up with her younger sister, Signe, and was often short of money.[1] This darker quality in his paintings gradually began to attract interest and he had paintings exhibited at the Paris Salon. He amassed a collection of animals to act as his living models. Ernst Malmberg recalled: The animals seemed to have an instinctive trust and actual attraction to him...There in his animal enclosure, we saw his inevitable power over its many residents??foxes, badgers, hares, squirrels, weasels, an eagle, eagle owl, hawk, capercaillie and black game.[1] The greatness of Liljefors lay in his ability to show animals in their environment.[1] Sometimes he achieved this through hunting and observation of the living animal, and sometimes he used dead animals: for example his Hawk and Black Game, painted in the winter of 1883-4, was based on dead specimens, but he also used his memory of the flocks of black grouse in the meadows around a cottage he once lived in at Ehrentuna, near Uppsala. He wrote: The hawk model??a young one??I killed myself. Everything was painted out of doors as was usually done in those days. It was a great deal of work trying to position the dead hawk and the grouse among the bushes that I bent in such a way as to make it seem lively, although the whole thing was in actuality a still life.[1]






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