Sandro Botticelli
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c. 1445 – May 17, 1510. Italian painter.

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Lavinia Fontana
Christ with the Symbols of the Passion

ID: 69732

Lavinia Fontana Christ with the Symbols of the Passion
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Lavinia Fontana Christ with the Symbols of the Passion


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Lavinia Fontana

Italian Painter, 1552-1614 Daughter of Prospero Fontana. She was trained by her father and followed his Mannerist style. Her first recorded works, which date from 1575, were small paintings for private devotion, such as the Holy Family (Dresden, Gemeldegal.). By 1577 she had become established as a portrait painter in Bologna. Works of this date include the Self-portrait at the Harpsichord (Rome, Gal. Accad. S Luca) and the portrait of Senator Orsini (Bordeaux, Mus. B.-A.). Her portrait style reflects the formality of central Italian models as well as the naturalistic tendencies of the north Italian tradition. The elegantly costumed Orsini is shown seated at a table, with a suite of rooms opening behind him, a setting recalling such Florentine portraits of the 1530s as Agnolo Bronzino's Bartolommeo Panciatichi (Florence, Uffizi). Lavinia used a similar setting for other portraits, including the Gozzadini Family (1584; Bologna, Pin. N.). Female sitters are also shown in elaborate dress, with particular attention paid to details of embroidery and jewels, and they are often accompanied by small dogs   Related Paintings of Lavinia Fontana :. | Self-Portrait | portratt av familjen gozzadini | Assumption of the Virgin | Self portrait | The consagracion to the Virgin one |
Related Artists:
Lorenzo Lotto
Italian 1480-1556 Lorenzo Lotto Galleries In this last period of his life, Lorenzo Lotto would frequently move from town to town, searching for patrons and commissions. In 1532 he went to Treviso. Next he spent about seven years in the Marches (Ancona, Macerata en Jesi), returning to Venice in 1540. He moved again to Treviso in 1542 and back to Venice in 1545. Finally he went back to Ancona in 1549. This was a productive period in his life, during which he painted several altarpieces and portraits : Santa Lucia before the Judge, 1532, Jesi, Pinacoteca comunale The Sleeping Child Jesus with the Madonna, St. Joseph and St. Catherine of Alexandria, 1533, Bergamo, Accademia Carrara Portrait of a Lady as Lucretia, 1533, National Gallery, London. Holy Family with SS Jerome, Anna and Joachim, 1534, Firenze, Uffizi Holy Family, ca 1537, Paris, Louvre Portrait of a Young Man, Firenze, Uffizi Crucifixion, Monte San Giusto, Church of S Maria in Telusiano Rosary Madonna, 1539, Cingoli, Church of San Nicolo Portrait of a Man, 1541, Ottawa, National Gallery of Canada Bust of a Bearded Man, 1541, ascribed, San Francisco, Fine Arts Museum The Alms of Saint Anthony, 1542, Venezia, church SS Giovanni e Paolo Madonna and four Saints, 1546, Venezia, Church of San Giacomo dell??Orio Portrait of fra?? Gregorio Belo da Vicenza, 1548,New York, Metropolitan Museum Assumption, 1550, Ancona, church San Francesco alle Scale The Crossbowman, 1551, Rome, Pinacoteca Capitolina Portrait of an Old man, ascribed, ca 1552, Saint Petersburg, Ermitage Presentation in the Temple, 1555, Loreto, Palazzo Apostolico A Venetian woman in the guise of Lucretia (1533).At the end of his life it was becoming increasingly difficult for him to earn a living. Furthermore, in 1550 one of his works had an unsuccessful auction in Ancona. As recorded in his personal account book, this deeply disillusioned him. As he had always been a deeply religious man, he entered in 1552 the Holy Sanctuary at Loreto, becoming a lay brother. During that time he decorated the basilica of S Maria and painted a Presentation in the Temple for the Palazzo Apostolico in Loreto. He died in 1556 and was buried, at his request, in a Dominican habit. Giorgio Vasari included Lotto's biography in the third volume of his book Vite. Lorenzo Lotto himself left many letters and a detailed notebook (Libro di spese diverse, 1538-1556), giving a certain insight in his life and work. Among the many painters he influenced are likely Giovanni Busi
Luigi Querena
Italian, 1820-1887
Albert Anker
1831-1910 Swiss Albert Anker Galleries During his studies, Anker produced a series of works with historical and biblical themes, including paintings of Luther and Calvin. Soon after returning to Ins, though, he turned to what would become his signature theme: the everyday life of people in rural communities. His paintings depict his fellow citizens in an unpretentious and plain manner, without idealising country life, but also without the critical examination of social conditions that can be found in the works of contemporaries such as Daumier, Courbet or Millet. Although Anker did paint occasional scenes with a social significance, such as visits by usurers or charlatans to the village, his affirmative and idealistic Christian world-view did not include an inclination to issue any sort of overt challenge. Also prominent in Anker's work are the more than 30 still lifes he created. They depict both rural and urban table settings in the tradition of Chardin, their realist solidity reflecting Anker's vision of a harmonic and stable world order. In addition, Anker created hundreds of commissioned watercolours and drawings, mostly portraits and illustrations, including for an edition of Jeremias Gotthelf's collected works. To provide for a steady income, Anker also decorated more than 500 faience plates for the Alsatian producer Theodore Deck. Anker was quick to reach his artistic objectives and never strayed from his chosen path. His works, though, exude a sense of conciliation and understanding as well as a calm trust in Swiss democracy; they are executed with great skill, providing brilliance to everyday scenes through subtle choices in colouring and lighting. Their parochial motives belie the open-mindedness towards contemporary European art and events that Anker's correspondence reflects.






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