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c. 1445 – May 17, 1510. Italian painter.

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Karoly Ferenczy
Double Portrait

ID: 82962

Karoly Ferenczy Double Portrait
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Karoly Ferenczy Double Portrait


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Karoly Ferenczy

1863-1917 Karoly Ferenczy Locations was a Hungarian Impressionist painter. He was one of the leading artists of the Nagybanya school of painting. He studied law and economics. He began to deal with painting at the Academie Julian in Paris. In 1889, he moved back to Hungary, to the town of Szentendre. Between 1893 and 1896 he lived in Munich with his family: There he joined the circle of Simon Hollosy: with whom he moved to Nagybanya in 1896 and became the leading painter of the artist colony. After 1906 he moved to Budapest and became the professor of the College of Fine Arts. His wife Olga Fialka and their children, the painter Valer Ferenczy (1885-1954), the tapestry weaver Noemi Ferenczy (1890-1957) and the sculptor Beni Ferenczy (1890- 1967) were famous representatives of Hungarian art.  Related Paintings of Karoly Ferenczy :. | October | Dupla portre | October | Boys Throwing Pebbles into the River | Double Portrait |
Related Artists:
Edward Arthur Walton
British Painter, 1860-1922 He trained at the Staatliche Kunstakademie in Desseldorf (1876-7) and Glasgow School of Art. One of the GLASGOW BOYS, he painted outdoors in the Trossachs and at Crowland, Lincs, with James Guthrie, Joseph Crawhall and George Henry. He also painted in W. Y. Macgregor's life studio in Glasgow. He joined the New English Art Club in 1887 and developed an atmospheric landscape style influenced by plein-air painting and by James McNeill Whistler with whom he was friendly during his stay in London (1894-1904); Autumn Sunshine (1884; U. Glasgow, Hunterian A.G.) is characteristic. Walton was a regular exhibitor from 1880 in both Glasgow, at the Institute of the Fine Arts, and Edinburgh, at the Royal Scottish Academy. He was elected an Associate of the Academy in 1889 and a full member in 1905, taking an active role in its affairs after moving to Edinburgh in 1904. He concentrated after c. 1885 on pastel and on watercolour, which he used notably in his Helensburgh and Kensington scenes of contemporary life. From 1915 he served as President of the Royal Scottish Water Colour Society. Oil was reserved largely for portraits in a Whistlerian style, such as the Artist's Mother.
Francois Quesnel
(ca. 1543 - 1619) was a French painter of Scottish extraction. The son of the French painter Pierre Quesnel and his Scottish wife Madeleine Digby, born in Edinburgh while his father worked for Mary of Guise, Quesnel found patronage at the French court of Catherine de Medici and her son, Henri III (illustration). He married Charlotte Richandeau, with whom he had four children. A widower, he remarried in 1584 Marguerite Le Masson, who gave him ten more children, among whom were Nicolas and Augustin, painters, and Jacques, bookseller. Portrait, possibly of Catherine-Charlotte de la Tremoille, ca 1589, attributed to QuesnelIn Paris he worked as a decorator and a designer of cartoons for tapestry, but it is as a portrait painter, both in oils and in delicately tinted pencil or red and black chalk he is chiefly remembered. Some portraits were engraved by Thomas de Leu and Michel Lasne, and in 1609 he drew a map of Paris for engraving by Pierre Vallet. He died in Paris.
John James Audubon
1785-1851 Audubon, John James ~ Bobwhite (Virginia Partridge), 1825Audubon developed his own methods for drawing birds. First, he killed them using fine shot to prevent them from being torn to pieces. He then used fixed wires to prop them up into a natural position, unlike the common method of many ornithologists of first preparing and stuffing the specimens into a rigid pose. When working on a major specimen, like an eagle, he would spend up to four 15 hour days, preparing, studying, and drawing it.[53] His paintings of birds are set true-to-life in their natural habitat and often caught them in motion, especially feeding or hunting. This was in stark contrast with the stiff representations of birds by his contemporaries, such as Alexander Wilson. He also based his paintings on his own field observations. He worked primarily with watercolor early on, then added colored chalk or pastel to add softness to feathers, especially those of owls and herons.[54] He would employ multiple layers of watercoloring, and sometimes use gouache. Small species were often drawn to scale, placed on branches with berries, fruit, and flowers, sometimes in flight, and often with many individual birds to present all views of anatomy. Larger birds were often placed in their ground habitat or perching on stumps. At times, as with woodpeckers, he would combine several species on one page to offer contrasting features. Nests and eggs are frequently depicted as well, and occasionally predators, such as snakes. He usually illustrated male and female variations, and sometimes juveniles. In later drawings, he had aides render the habitat for him. Going behind faithful renderings of anatomy, Audubon employed carefully constructed composition, drama, and slightly exaggerated poses to achieve artistic as well as scientific effects.






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