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c. 1445 – May 17, 1510. Italian painter.

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Jacopo Bassano
Madonna and Child with St.John as a Child

ID: 28906

Jacopo Bassano Madonna and Child with St.John as a Child
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Jacopo Bassano Madonna and Child with St.John as a Child


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Jacopo Bassano

Italian c1510-1592 Jacopo Bassano Gallery He was apprenticed to his father, with whom he collaborated on the Nativity (1528; Valstagna, Vicenza, parish church). In the first half of the 1530s Jacopo trained in Venice with Bonifazio de Pitati, whose influence, with echoes of Titian, is evident in the Flight into Egypt (1534; Bassano del Grappa, Mus. Civ.). He continued to work in the family shop until his fathers death in 1539. His paintings from those years were mainly altarpieces for local churches; many show signs of collaboration. He also worked on public commissions, such as the three canvases on biblical subjects (1535-6; Bassano del Grappa, Mus. Civ.) for the Palazzo Communale, Bassano del Grappa, in which the narrative schemes learnt from Bonifazio are combined with a new naturalism. From 1535 he concentrated on fresco painting, executing, for example, the interior and exterior decoration (1536-7) of S Lucia di Tezze, Vicenza, which demonstrates the maturity of his technique.  Related Paintings of Jacopo Bassano :. | The Supper at Emmaus | Portrait of a Franciscan Friar | The good Samaritan | The Crucifixion | Paradiso terrestre |
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James Sharples
(1751 or 1752 in Lancashire - 26 February 1811 in New York ) was an English portrait painter and pastelist, who moved to the United States in 1794. He first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1779. James was first intended for the Catholic priesthood, but became an artist instead.Sharples headed a family of successful portrait artists, including his third wife Ellen Sharples. He had four children, George by his first wife, Felix Thomas Sharples from his second marriage (c. 1786- after 1823), and James Sharples Jr.(c. 1788-1839) and daughter Rolinda Sharples (1793-1838) with this third wife, Ellen. Felix, James Jr. and Rolinda joined the family enterprise at ages 17, 15, and 13 respectively. Before marrying Ellen Wallace, James had been active in Bristol, Liverpool and Bath, where he taught drawing. Ellen was a lady of French extraction who had relations in America. The family left for the United States in 1796, but, according to Ellen's diaries, their ship fell into the hands of the French, and for seven months the family spent time in Brest, near Cherbourg. Landing in New York, James quickly became popular for his small portraits in pastel and his miniatures. From 1796 to 1801 he worked mainly in Philadelphia and New York, securing portrait commissions. The family traveled throughout New England region as itinerant portrait painters, looking for work and making inexpensive copies from the originals portraits they had made of popular and well-known figures, such as George Washington and James Madison.
Morgan, Evelyn De
English, 1855-1919 Painter, wife of William De Morgan. She was a pupil of her uncle, the painter Roddam Spencer Stanhope. In 1873-5 she attended the Slade School of Art, London. While there, she was awarded a Slade scholarship entitling her to financial assistance for three years. The scholarship required that she draw in charcoal from the nude, but she eventually declined it because she did not wish to continue working in this technique, although she excelled in it. She was influenced by the work of the Pre-Raphaelite artists and became a follower of Burne-Jones. In 1877 she first exhibited at the Grosvenor Gallery, London, and continued to show there thereafter. From 1875 she spent several winters in Florence working and studying; some of her work is reminiscent of Botticelli, possibly because of her visits to Florence. She often depicted women in unfamiliar ways though in a manner more in tune with a female perspective.






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