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c. 1445 – May 17, 1510. Italian painter.

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Colin Campbell Cooper
Summer

ID: 97425

Colin Campbell Cooper Summer
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Colin Campbell Cooper

1856-1937 Colin Campbell Cooper Galleries Cooper was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Dr. Colin Campbell Cooper and Emily William Cooper. He studied art at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts under Thomas Eakins, and at Acad??mie Julian in Paris. Back in Philadelphia, he taught watercolor classes at the Drexel Institute of Art, Science and Industry (now Drexel University). In 1897 he married renowned artist Emma Lampert, and the next year they moved to New York City, where he began work on his famous skyscraper paintings. He travelled extensively, sketching and painting scenes of Europe, Asia, and the United States in watercolors and oils. He and his wife were on the RMS Carpathia and assisted in the rescue of the survivors of the Titanic. Several of his paintings document the rescue. In 1912, Cooper was elected to a prestigious membership in the National Academy of Design. Cooper exhibited in San Francisco's Panama-Pacific Exposition of 1915, winning the Gold Medal for oil and the Silver Medal for watercolor. He also participated in the Panama-California Exposition in San Diego. In 1920 his wife Emma died. He moved to Santa Barbara, California in 1921 and became dean of the School of Painting at the Santa Barbara Community School of Arts. He married his second wife, Marie Frehsee, in 1927. Cooper died in Santa Barbara in 1937.  Related Paintings of Colin Campbell Cooper :. | Self-Portrait | A California Water Garden at Redlands | A Rocky Glenn | Columbus Circle | A Santa Barbara Courtyard |
Related Artists:
Thomas Gainsborough
1727-1788 British Thomas Gainsborough Locations English painter, draughtsman and printmaker. He was the contemporary and rival of Joshua Reynolds, who honoured him on 10 December 1788 with a valedictory Discourse (pubd London, 1789), in which he stated: If ever this nation should produce genius sufficient to acquire to us the honourable distinction of an English School, the name of Gainsborough will be transmitted to posterity, in the history of Art, among the very first of that rising name. He went on to consider Gainsborough portraits, landscapes and fancy pictures within the Old Master tradition, against which, in his view, modern painting had always to match itself. Reynolds was acknowledging a general opinion that Gainsborough was one of the most significant painters of their generation. Less ambitious than Reynolds in his portraits, he nevertheless painted with elegance and virtuosity. He founded his landscape manner largely on the study of northern European artists and developed a very beautiful and often poignant imagery of the British countryside. By the mid-1760s he was making formal allusions to a wide range of previous art, from Rubens and Watteau to, eventually, Claude and Titian. He was as various in his drawings and was among the first to take up the new printmaking techniques of aquatint and soft-ground etching. Because his friend, the musician and painter William Jackson (1730-1803), claimed that Gainsborough detested reading, there has been a tendency to deny him any literacy. He was, nevertheless, as his surviving letters show, verbally adept, extremely witty and highly cultured. He loved music and performed well. He was a person of rapidly changing moods, humorous, brilliant and witty. At the time of his death he was expanding the range of his art, having lived through one of the more complex and creative phases in the history of British painting. He painted with unmatched skill and bravura; while giving the impression of a kind of holy innocence, he was among the most artistically learned and sophisticated painters of his generation. It has been usual to consider his career in terms of the rivalry with Reynolds that was acknowledged by their contemporaries; while Reynolds maintained an intellectual and academic ideal of art, Gainsborough grounded his imagery on contemporary life, maintaining an aesthetic outlook previously given its most powerful expression by William Hogarth. His portraits, landscapes and subject pictures are only now coming to be studied in all their complexity; having previously been viewed as being isolated from the social, philosophical and ideological currents of their time, they have yet to be fully related to them. It is clear, however, that his landscapes and rural pieces, and some of his portraits, were as significant as Reynolds acknowledged them to be in 1788.
Charles Roscoe Savage
1832-1909, He was a British-born landscape and portrait photographer who produced images of the American West. He is best known for his 1869 photographs of the linking of the first transcontinental railroad. Savage was born in Southampton, England, on August 16, 1832. At age 14, he joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). After serving missions for the church in Switzerland and England, he emigrated to the United States during the winter of 1855?C56. He initially found work as a photographer in New York City, and headed west the following year. He first settled in Nebraska, then Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he established his first independent studio and gallery. In the spring of 1860, he traveled to Salt Lake City, Utah Territory with his family, where he established a photography studio with a partner, Marsena Cannon, an early Utah daguerreotypist and photographer. A year later, after Cannon moved to southern Utah, Savage established a partnership with artist George Ottinger. Many of Savage's photographs were reproduced in Harper's Weekly newspaper, which created a national reputation for the firm. This partnership continued until 1870. As a photographer under contract with the Union Pacific Railroad, Savage traveled to California in 1866 and then followed the rails back to Utah. He photographed the linking of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific on Promontory Summit, at Promontory, Utah in 1869
john D.rockefeller
new york metropolian museum, cloisters collection






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